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Thread: Yaesu FTM-400D - Programming

  1. #1
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member N1HX's Avatar
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    Yaesu FTM-400D - Programming

    Quote Originally Posted by AC0VH View Post
    He mentioned that Yaesu gives away free programming software for the FT-1D, which I was unaware of but checking on their website sure enough it was true. So maybe they will do the same for the FTM-400. Fingers crossed.
    Apparently it helps to be fluent in Japanese to use Yaesu's FT-1D programming software. I purchased RT-System's 1D software so I never downloaded Yaesu's offering. I am planning a marathon programming session tonight and will try to enter all AZ VHF/UHF repeaters into my radio. Hopefully I will be able to save the memories to the SD card, extract it and post it for all AZ owners to download. That may be the only short term answer… I attempted to get the 400 to read the card from my FT-1D but of course, no luck. The memory storage is set up differently on both radios.

  2. #2
    4x4 Ham Member AC0VH's Avatar
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    I think his reasoning was to be able to pig back on the programmer to reverse engineer the protocol. Might be the same thing RT Systems is waiting for.

  3. #3
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member N1HX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC0VH View Post
    I think his reasoning was to be able to pig back on the programmer to reverse engineer the protocol. Might be the same thing RT Systems is waiting for.
    Makes sense. No need to reinvent the wheel.

    Hope it happens soon.

    Until that time comes though, I have an answer for Arizona owners. I uploaded my 400's memory file that has every 2 meter and 70 cm AZ repeater in alphabetical order. Hope it is helpful.


    http://www.4x4ham.com/downloads.php?do=file&id=156

  4. #4
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member N1HX's Avatar
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    N7IYT had success downloading the dat file I just uploaded and it loaded my memory channels into his radio. :bacon: Just a thought, but do you think it may be easy to manipulate the dat files the 400 saves on the SD card with a PC and this may be the reason software isn't being developed for it? I don't have programming experience but maybe someone could take a look at the dat file I uploaded. I'll try to play around with it to see if I can figure out a program that will read it.

  5. #5
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member KY7K's Avatar
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    Where is the alphabetical list you used? Are the first four freqs:
    147.52
    144.95
    446.50
    145.31
    Steve - KY7K
    That's the thoughts of a fool, thinking out loud.

  6. #6
    4x4 Ham Member W5PKY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by N1HX View Post
    N7IYT had success downloading the dat file I just uploaded and it loaded my memory channels into his radio. :bacon: Just a thought, but do you think it may be easy to manipulate the dat files the 400 saves on the SD card with a PC and this may be the reason software isn't being developed for it? I don't have programming experience but maybe someone could take a look at the dat file I uploaded. I'll try to play around with it to see if I can figure out a program that will read it.
    Try just a plain text editor. Notepad, Text, vi, nano, etc. If the frequency values are in numeric form, they might be easy to modify (I'd image the card before screwing with it though so you have a backup).

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    It is not a text file. Looked at with vi and less.

  8. #8
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member N1HX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KY7K View Post
    Where is the alphabetical list you used? Are the first four freqs:
    147.52
    144.95
    446.50
    145.31
    Right on the nose! May we have something here? How did you read the data?

  9. #9
    4x4 Ham Member AC0VH's Avatar
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    Definitely a binary file, not plain text. I use vim as my editor. Just a string of ASCII. If a few people post these files maybe we can start to decode them. It starts with the header 'AH034' and then follows with what is anyone's guess. Not much discernible as numbers or alpha data.

  10. #10
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member KY7K's Avatar
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    Im just using a binary editor (on OS X, Hex Fiend) to look at the file.
    Without having a radio to change things to compare the differences it's difficult to see much more than frequency data which is easy to see as packed BCD. It appears that, part, of the channel data starts at 0x512 and is 16 bytes long per channel. Just guessing this is freq, and other things like pl, sql mode, offset, ect...
    It does not appear that the alphanumeric text for the channel is in the same place, I think that may be encoded for each channel beginning at 0x17088.

    To figure out much more we need to start changing items one at a time and comparing the differences to find out exactly the format and location of each item. The basic format should be easy to figure out.
    Steve - KY7K
    That's the thoughts of a fool, thinking out loud.

  11. #11
    4x4 Ham Member AC0VH's Avatar
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    Starting to see it now. Thanks KY7K for pointing out to look at it as a HEX file (I even already have Hex Fiend). Duh, analog guys are so dense sometimes.

    A quick-n-dirty way is to get VIM for Windows:
    http://www.vim.org/download.php

    Put the .dat file some place it's easy to find.

    Open VIM and type
    ":r !xxd path-to-file/MEMFTM400D.dat"

    VIM will convert the file to 4-byte grouped ASCII (address 200h is 512d). You will see something like...

    Code:
    0000200: 8100 0147 5207 0000 000c 008f 000c 0000  ...GR...........
    0000210: 8100 0144 9507 0000 000c 008f 000c 0000  ...D............
    0000220: 8300 0446 5007 0000 000c 008f 0064 0000  ...FP........d..
    0000230: 8102 0145 3110 0000 000c 008f 000c 0000  ...E1...........
    0000240: 8303 8442 5217 0000 0010 008f 0064 0000  ...BR........d..
    0000250: 8102 0146 8210 0000 001b 008f 000c 0000  ...F............
    0000260: 8102 0146 9810 0000 000c 008f 000c 0000  ...F............
    0000270: 8302 0447 7517 0000 000c 008f 0064 0000  ...Gu........d..
    0000280: 8302 0445 3017 0000 0014 008f 0064 0000  ...E0........d..
    0000290: 8302 8448 8217 0000 000e 008f 0064 0000  ...H.........d..
    For comparison this is what looks like an unprogrammed location.
    Code:
    0001420: 0100 0145 0006 0000 0008 000f 0000 0000  ...E............

    It would be helpful if you could also post tones and possibly alpha tags you used. Also did you program both sides of the radio or just one side? Did you program in a total of 289 entries? The last one on the top (if that's the side you programmed) appears to be 1410h. Which puts the final one at 2250h at number 517. Then if 2260h is the start of the other side at 42b0h, also 517 locations.

    I'm wondering if 2260h is the beginning of the bottom side of the radio.
    Code:
    0002260: 8300 0430 0007 0000 000c 000f 0064 0000  ...0.........d..
    Is it 430.000MHz in your radio?

  12. #12
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member N1HX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC0VH View Post
    Starting to see it now. Thanks KY7K for pointing out to look at it as a HEX file (I even already have Hex Fiend). Duh, analog guys are so dense sometimes.

    It would be helpful if you could also post tones and possibly alpha tags you used. Also did you program both sides of the radio or just one side? Did you program in a total of 289 entries? The last one on the top (if that's the side you programmed) appears to be 1410h. Which puts the final one at 2250h at number 517. Then if 2260h is the start of the other side at 42b0h, also 517 locations.

    I'm wondering if 2260h is the beginning of the bottom side of the radio.
    Code:
    0002260: 8300 0430 0007 0000 000c 000f 0064 0000  ...0.........d..
    Is it 430.000MHz in your radio?
    289 entries is correct. I programmed the A band in the radio only. Nothing is entered in the B band. Here is the list I used to enter into the radio. The repeaters without a PL may or may not have a PL entered into the radio. I wasn't concerned about a PL in these cases since the repeater would open up anyway and I had a LOT of data to enter by hand. I am sure I did not enter any PL in the first 3 memory channels. Also, repeater names have been abbreviated and should be considered unreliable to read if longer than 8 characters (max for the radio) unless you can guess what I used as an abbreviation - good luck. I am willing to go through the list in more detail or make up a fake list (which may be the best way to go) and make changes to it in a logical way to give us the best info. I am open to suggestions on what to enter for data. Maybe 26 memory entries as such…
    (Memory Channel #, Name , Frequency, PL)
    1 AAAAAAAA 144.010 67.0
    2 BBBBBBBB 144.020 71.9
    3 CCCCCCCC 144.030 74.4
    4 DDDDDDD 144.040 77.0 etc until I get to
    26 ZZZZZZZZ 144.260
    Any ideas would be welcome for logical test files.

    Here is the list I used: I did not enter the last zero in each frequency - the radio allows 6 digits to be entered. The 7 digit scheme is how it exported from Travel Plus.
    4X4Ham 147.9200
    C4FM 2M 144.9500
    C4FM UHF 446.5000
    Ajo Childs Mtn 145.3100 100
    Ajo Childs Mtn 145.3100 100
    Anthem 442.5250 114.8
    Bank One 146.8200 162.2
    Bell Butte 146.9800 100
    Bell Butte 447.7500 100
    Benson 445.3000 131.8
    Benson 448.8250 107.2
    Bill Williams Mtn 146.7800 91.5
    Bill Williams Mtn 449.7500 91.5
    Black Canyon C 146.9000 118.8
    Black Peak 146.8500 162.2
    Bouse 147.3000 100
    Bullhead City 145.1700 131.8
    Bullhead City 146.6400 123
    Bullhead City 448.9500 123
    Bullhead City 449.6250 136.5
    Bullhead City 449.9500 100
    Bullhead City 449.9750
    Casa Grande 146.7800 100
    Casa Grande 446.8250 88.5
    Cave Creek 147.3200
    Central Phoenix 146.6400 162.2
    Chandler 145.2100 131.8
    Chandler 145.4500 162.2
    Chandler 447.5000 100
    Chandler 448.4500 136.5
    Chandler 448.9250 123
    Chandler 448.9500 100
    Chase Tower 444.3000 100
    Childs Mtn 448.1000 100
    Chloride 146.7000 173.8
    Clarkdale 441.7750
    Clay Springs 442.8000 100
    Coolidge 145.2100 162.2
    Coolidge 446.6000 151.4
    Crown King 447.3000 88.5
    Cunningham Peak 147.0600 203.5
    Dewey 441.8500 151.4
    Diamond Point 449.1000 100
    Dolan Springs 146.9600 100
    Dolan Springs 147.1000
    Dolan Springs 147.3200
    Dolan Springs 449.8750
    Dos Cabezas 449.0250
    Duncan 146.9600
    Eager 441.2000
    East Tucson 146.6600 110.9
    Eden 146.9400
    Elephant Head Peak 449.3750 107.2
    Elgin 448.5000 91.5
    Flagstaff 145.4100 151.4
    Flagstaff 145.4500 103.5
    Flagstaff 440.4000 100
    Gila Bend 145.2900 103.5
    Gilbert 449.8250 100
    Glendale 447.4000 100
    Glendale 447.5750 151.4
    Glendale 448.3250 100
    Glendale 449.5750 100
    Golden Valley 448.4000 123
    Grand Canyon 442.0750 100
    Green Valley 145.2700
    Green Valley 145.2900
    Green Valley 145.4300
    Green Valley 146.6200
    Green Valley 449.2250 100
    Greens Peak 145.3100 110.9
    Greens Peak 146.6100 162.2
    Greens Peak 146.7000 141.3
    Greens Peak 146.7200 162.2
    Greens Peak 448.3750 100
    Greens Peak 448.8500 110.9
    Greens Peak 449.3500 162.2
    Guadalupe Peak 147.3600 107.2
    Guthrie Peak 145.3500
    Guthrie Peak 145.3900 141.3
    Guthrie Peak 147.2800 141.3
    Hayden Peak 146.7600 131.8
    Haystack Mtn 145.3700 131.8
    Heber 146.8000 162.2
    Heliograph Peak 146.8600 141.3
    Heliograph Peak 146.9000 141.3
    Heliograph Peak 440.6500 141.3
    Heliograph Peak 440.7000 141.3
    Heliograph Peak 447.8250 100
    Holbrook 146.6800
    Hopi Pt Grand 147.3200
    Hualapai Mtn 448.2500 131.8
    Jacob Lake 147.3000
    Keystone Mtn 449.8750 100
    Kingman 146.9400
    Kingman 446.1500 100
    Kingman 449.7500 123
    Lake Havasu City 146.6400 156.7
    Lake Havasu City 146.9000
    Lake Havasu City 146.9600 162.2
    Lake Havasu City 449.9500 141.3
    Laveene 449.2500 192.8
    Maricopa 449.1250
    Maryvale Hospital 446.2250 114.8
    Mesa 145.3300 114.8
    Mesa 146.7200 100
    Mesa 146.8600 162.2
    Mesa 147.1200 162.2
    Mesa 447.4250 107.2
    Mesa 449.0250 100
    Mesa 449.3750
    Mesa 449.6000 100
    Mesa 449.6250 100

  13. #13
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member N1HX's Avatar
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    continuned...
    Mingus Mtn 145.2900 127.3
    Mingus Mtn 147.0000 162.2
    Mingus Mtn 147.2200 162.2
    Mingus Mtn 442.1500
    Mingus Mtn 449.7250 110.9
    Mormon Mtn 145.2700 162.2
    Mormon Mtn 449.6000 162.2
    Mt Benedict 147.3800
    Mt Bernadino 147.3400 162.2
    Mt Elden 146.9800 162.2
    Mt Elden 147.1400 162.2
    Mt Elden 448.4750 100
    Mt Elden 448.8750 100
    Mt Elden 449.3250 103.5
    Mt Lemmon 145.3900 156.7
    Mt Lemmon 146.8800 110.9
    Mt Lemmon 147.1000 100
    Mt Lemmon 147.1400 127.3
    Mt Lemmon 147.1600 141.3
    Mt Lemmon 445.2250 103.5
    Mt Lemmon 448.5500 110.9
    Mt Lemmon 449.9750 100
    Mt Ord 146.9200 162.2
    Mt Ord 146.9600 141.3
    Mt Ord 147.3600 162.2
    Mt Ord 444.5000 100
    Mt Union 147.2600 103.5
    Mule Mtn 146.7600 162.2
    Mule Mtn 449.5250 100
    Mule Mtn Bisbe 147.0200 162.2
    Nah-Ah-Tee Mesa 146.8600 162.2
    Navajo Mtn 146.9600
    Oro Valley 147.2200 110.9
    Oro Valley 440.4000 156.7
    Oro Valley 449.5750 100
    P Mtn 445.3000 100
    P Mtn 448.5000 100
    Page 449.9250
    Payson 147.3900 100
    Peach Springs 147.3400 91.5
    Phoenix 145.1700 162.2
    Phoenix 145.1900 162.2
    Phoenix 145.2300 173.8
    Phoenix 145.2300 94.8
    Phoenix 146.7000 162.2
    Phoenix 146.8000 100
    Phoenix 147.0600 162.2
    Phoenix 147.2800 162.2
    Phoenix 441.2000 77
    Phoenix 442.0500 100
    Phoenix 442.6000 100
    Phoenix 442.6750 127.3
    Phoenix 446.1500 100
    Phoenix 447.9500 100
    Phoenix 449.2000 100
    Pinal Peak 145.4100 141.3
    Pinal Peak 147.2000 162.2
    Pinal Peak 448.4250 103.5
    Pinal Peak 448.4750 100
    Porter Mtn 146.7600 162.2
    Porter Mtn 449.0500 162.2
    Potato Patch 147.1600 131.8
    Potholes Hill 146.8400 88.5
    Prescott 145.3900
    Prescott 146.8800 100
    Prescott 447.1750 100
    Prescott Valley 443.0500 136.5
    Quartzsite 145.3100 162.2
    Queen Creek 443.1250 100
    Red Mountain 449.9500
    Red Mtn/Patago 146.6400
    Red Sky Ranch 449.6250 136.5
    Roof Butte 145.2500 100
    Roof Butte 146.8200 100
    S Mtn Alpine 145.2700 141.3
    S Tucson 147.3900 100
    Sacaton Peak 447.7250 100
    Scottsdale 147.1800 162.2
    Scottsdale 147.3400 162.2
    Scottsdale 440.4500 100
    Scottsdale 441.1000 103.5
    Scottsdale 441.6250 100
    Scottsdale 442.0250 100
    Scottsdale 443.1500 100
    Scottsdale 446.5750 146.2
    Scottsdale 449.4250 100
    Scottsdale Air 146.7600 162.2
    Shaw Butte 146.8400 162.2
    Shaw Butte 147.2400 162.2
    Shaw Butte 442.8500 100
    Shaw Butte 449.5250 100
    Show Low 449.1500 110.9
    Sierra Vista 147.3600 100
    Sierra Vista 447.9500 100
    Sierra Vista 449.7250 179.9
    Sierra Vista 449.8250 100
    Signal Peak 449.6500 100
    Signal Peak West 146.6200 103.5
    Signal Peak/Pina 146.7400 162.2
    Smith Peak 146.6800 162.2
    Smith Peak 443.7750 100
    Snowflake 447.3750 136.5
    South Mtn 147.0200 162.2
    South Mtn 442.1250 100
    South Mtn 442.2000 100
    South Mtn 442.5500 100
    South Mtn 442.8000 100
    South Mtn 443.0500 100
    South Mtn 443.8000 100
    Squaw Peak 147.1000 131.8
    Squaw Peak 447.3250 131.8
    Squaw Peak 447.4000 100
    Squaw Peak Verde 145.3300 156.7
    St Johns 147.3000 136.5
    Sun City 449.8000 100
    Sun City West 147.3000 162.2
    Surprise 442.9000 100
    Telegraph Pass 146.7800 103.5
    Telegraph Pass 449.0750 88.5
    Tempe 145.2700
    Tempe 442.9750 100
    Tempe 448.5250 127.3
    Tempe Butte 442.3750 100
    Thompson Peak 147.0800 162.2
    Thompson Peak 448.8250 100
    Tolleson 448.0750 100
    Towers Mtn 145.3700 162.2
    Towers Mtn 147.0400 107.2
    Towers Mtn 448.5750 100
    Towers Mtn 449.1750 100
    Tuba City 444.5750 100
    Tucson 145.1700
    Tucson 145.3100
    Tucson 145.3300 127.3
    Tucson 145.4500
    Tucson 145.4900
    Tucson 146.6800 173.8
    Tucson 146.7000 127.3
    Tucson 146.7200 110.9
    Tucson 146.8000 156.7
    Tucson 146.8200 110.9
    Tucson 146.8500
    Tucson 146.9400 110.9
    Tucson 146.9600 127.3
    Tucson 147.0000 100
    Tucson 147.0400 123
    Tucson 147.0600 100
    Tucson 147.2200 110.9
    Tucson 147.3000 110.9
    Tucson 440.0500
    Tucson 441.7500 107.2
    Tucson 446.9000 100
    Tucson 447.1000 151.4
    Tucson 448.2500 107.2
    Tucson 448.3250 156.7
    Tucson 448.7750
    Tucson 449.2500 100
    Tucson 449.3000 156.7
    Tucson 449.4750
    Tucson 449.6750 77
    Tucson 449.8000 503
    Usery Mtn 447.6500
    Usery Pass 146.6600 162.2
    Usery Peak 145.4700 79.7
    Vail 446.5500 100
    Vail 449.5500 107.2
    White Hills 447.6000 107.2
    White Tanks 145.4300 100
    White Tanks 441.7250 100
    White Tanks 442.2750 100
    White Tanks 446.4000 100
    White Tanks Mtn 146.9400 162.2
    Wildflower Mtn 145.3500 162.2
    Willow Beach 147.1200 131.8
    Window Rock 145.2900 123
    Window Rock 442.0000 100
    Winslow 146.8400
    Winslow 147.3800 162.2
    Yale Point 448.0000 100
    Yuma 146.7400 162.2
    Yuma 146.8000 162.2
    Yuma 146.9200 88.5
    Yuma 446.6000
    Yuma 449.9250 88.5

  14. #14
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member KY7K's Avatar
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    Played around a bit more, then got bored and quit. So far I have freq, pl, offset and band figured out.

    Channel data begins at 0x200 (Forgot that hex fiend displays addresses in decimal ) Each channel is 16 bytes long and does not include alphanumeric name.
    What I have so far is (going low memory to higher, example 0x200 to 0x210) I working as big endian here...
    byte 0: xxxxxxXx : X=Band 1=70cm 0=2m
    byte 1: xxxxxxXX : XX= Offset 00=simplex 10=minus 11=plus
    byte 2: Freq low nibble packed BCD 100Mhz, high nibble contains additional data. bit 4 1= 5khz freq. example 448.005
    byte 3: Freq packed BCD 10Mhz and 1Mhz
    byte 4: Freq packed BCD 100Khz and 10Khz
    byte 5: (There is something here, but I'm just not seeing it argh!)
    byte 9: PL tone beginning with 0x00=67.0hz, 0x01=69.3hz, ect... 0x0C=100.0, 0x16=141.3, 0x1B=162.2

    EDIT: Didn't see your list before posting this. With your list I was able to verify that the alphanumeric name does indeed begin at 0x42c0 (17088d) and is 8 bytes per channel. The data is not in ascii, but appears to be the same order that they are selected when programming(?), hard to verify without a radio. What I mean is 0=0x00, 1=0x01, 2=0x02...A=0x0A, B=0x0B... ect... so TUCSON = 0x1d, 0x1e, 0x0c, 0x1c, 0x18, 0x17
    Does that thing do lowercase?

    With this much info, it would be easy to write a editor that would handle most of what is needed to enter channel data.
    Steve - KY7K
    That's the thoughts of a fool, thinking out loud.

  15. #15
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member N1HX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KY7K View Post
    Played around a bit more, then got bored and quit. So far I have freq, pl, offset and band figured out.

    Channel data begins at 0x200 (Forgot that hex fiend displays addresses in decimal ) Each channel is 16 bytes long and does not include alphanumeric name.
    What I have so far is (going low memory to higher, example 0x200 to 0x210) I working as big endian here...
    byte 1: xxxxxxXx : X=Band 1=70cm 0=2m
    byte 2: xxxxxxXX : XX= Offset 00=simplex 10=minus 11=plus
    byte 3: Freq low nibble packed BCD 100Mhz, high nibble contains additional data. bit 5 1= 5khz freq. example 448.005
    byte 4: Freq packed BCD 10Mhz and 1Mhz
    byte 5: Freq packed BCD 100Khz and 10Khz
    byte 6: (There is something here, but I'm just not seeing it argh!)
    byte 10: PL tone beginning with 0x00=67.0hz, 0x01=69.3hz, ect... 0x0C=100.0, 0x16=141.3, 0x1B=162.2

    EDIT: Didn't see your list before posting this. With your list I was able to verify that the alphanumeric name does indeed begin at 0x42c0 (17088d) and is 16 bytes per channel. The data is not in ascii, but appears to be the same order that they are selected when programming(?), hard to verify without a radio. What I mean is 0=0x00, 1=0x01, 2=0x02...A=0x0A, B=0x0B... ect... so TUCSON = 0x1d, 0x1e, 0x0c, 0x1c, 0x18, 0x17
    Does that thing do lowercase?
    Thanks for the insight. I'm thinking you could write the programming software yourself. I'd be a buyer!

    I am wondering if it wouldn't be easier for a developer to write a program that created a dat file directly which could be placed on the radio's SD card and uploaded to the radio using the backup feature already built into the radio vs developing a program that pushes the dat file directly to the radio's memory via a usb cable...

  16. #16
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member KY7K's Avatar
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    Also, repeater names have been abbreviated and should be considered unreliable to read if longer than 8 characters (max for the radio) unless you can guess what I used as an abbreviation - good luck.

    You used BULHDCTY for Bullhead City
    Steve - KY7K
    That's the thoughts of a fool, thinking out loud.

  17. #17
    4x4 Ham Member AC0VH's Avatar
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    Bit 0 of Byte 0 : 1 = Programmed, 0 = Unused
    Bits 5,6,7 of Byte 0 : 000 = VHF Air Band, 001 = Ham VHF, 010 = GEN1, 011 = Ham UHF, 100 = GEN 2, 101 thru 111 = Unused
    Byte 5 or 13 : Power Levels? It has 3 levels
    Byte 9 : 00 to 2A for tones? It does all 42 from 67.2 to 254.1
    Byte 10 : DCS code?

    It does upper, lower, numerals and symbols.

    There's mode data stuck in there, AM, FM, ND, WD

  18. #18
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member KY7K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC0VH View Post
    Bit 0 of Byte 0 : 1 = Programmed, 0 = Unused
    Bits 5,6,7 of Byte 0 : 000 = VHF Air Band, 001 = Ham VHF, 010 = GEN1, 011 = Ham UHF, 100 = GEN 2, 101 thru 111 = Unused
    Byte 5 or 13 : Power Levels? It has 3 levels
    Byte 9 : 00 to 2A for tones? It does all 42 from 67.2 to 254.1
    Byte 10 : DCS code?

    It does upper, lower, numerals and symbols.

    There's mode data stuck in there, AM, FM, ND, WD
    byte 10 is definitely PL tone, need a file with DCS set on a few freqs, I'm sure it's in the same byte. Edited my byte list to start at 0 to match yours, was starting at 1.
    Steve - KY7K
    That's the thoughts of a fool, thinking out loud.

  19. #19
    4x4 Ham Member Supporting Member KY7K's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    Tucson, AZ
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    169
    Quote Originally Posted by N1HX View Post
    I am wondering if it wouldn't be easier for a developer to write a program that created a dat file directly which could be placed on the radio's SD card and uploaded to the radio using the backup feature already built into the radio vs developing a program that pushes the dat file directly to the radio's memory via a usb cable...
    This is the way I would do if I were to hack something together. Would be much easier than figuring out the communication protocol.
    Steve - KY7K
    That's the thoughts of a fool, thinking out loud.

  20. #20
    4x4 Ham Member AC0VH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Loveland, CO
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    542
    Yes, 0 to 15 big endian. Thinking Byte 5 (e.g. 6) has something to do with half steps or resolution.

    442.525.00
    145.310.00
    144.950.00

    First order of business tomorrow is get an SD card for my radio.

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